quelle


 10 Feb 2010 @ 6:38 AM 
 

Interpreters On Facebook

 

Okay, so perhaps it’s a little weird for me to advertise for anyone’s Facebook page when I’m not using it myself. I’m considering it, but since I can’t seem to keep up a simple blog, it’s almost ridiculous for me to start yet another project that I won’t be able to keep up with. That being said…

Some of the interpreters here at the schoolhouse have started a Facebook page. The interpreters are very important to our mission, adding the ability to communicate with and teach Afghans of all types. The Afghan National Security Forces are obviously key partners, and they need to be able to apply the principles of COIN in their own country. It is, after all, their fight as well. They are the ones who are going to have to live here in the future. There are other key stakeholders in this fight, too; we teach and partner with various non-military Afghan government entities as well as non-governmental organizations (NGO’s). Without our interpreters, those interactions would wind up being pantomime sessions of extremely limited value. Several of our interpreters can teach any of the classes in our Program of Instruction (POI) by themselves. They are invaluable.

Our interpreters are patriots. Almost all of our interpreters have several years or more of experience as interpreters, and they are some of the best interpreters in the country. By experience, I mean operational, combat experience. They have put their lives on the line for Afghanistan and their American counterparts. One was even an ANA Commando until a wound ended his military career… but he’s still contributing to the success of the fledgling Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

Being an interpreter can be a dangerous business. They must be careful whom they disclose their employment to. Some do not burden their families with the knowledge. One of our interpreters suffered a home invasion a few months ago. The reason? Because he is an interpreter. Like I said, these men are patriots.

They are also very open about sharing their language and their culture with their allies. They actively encourage American and NATO personnel to ask honest questions and truly enjoy it when someone expresses a genuine interest in Afghanistan, its language and its culture. Having the opportunity to engage Afghan patriots is a rare privilege for the average American. I encourage you to visit their page and engage them in discussion. Get the Afghan point of view on the issues that face Afghanistan and the Coalition. These men are speaking only for themselves, but what an opportunity to get rare insight from patriotic young Afghans.

Tags Tags: , , ,
Categories: Afghanistan, COIN
Posted By: Old Blue
Last Edit: 10 Feb 2010 @ 06 38 AM

EmailPermalink
 

Responses to this post » (10 Total)

 
  1. [...] of Afghanistan . Being an interpreter can be a dangerous business . … See original here: Afghan Quest » Blog Archive » Interpreters On Facebook Share and [...]

  2. membrain says:

    Thanks for the link Blue. That’s a sign of progress. It’s good to see you writing again. All the best with your mission. Stay as safe as you can.

  3. Blue –

    I just stumbled on an old post of yours —
    http://billandbobsadventure.blogspot.com/2007/05/reconnaisance-to-jalalabad.html
    Reconnaisance to Jalalabad, after a search for the Khogyani District of Afghanistan. My brother is in FOB Fenty right now. He just posted some incredible photos of the Khogyani mountains on his Flickr page (Ocediis). I’m so glad I came across your blog. We civilians have no true perspective without hearing it straight from you. The news accounts of the war are so out of touch and almost completely irrelevant. THANK YOU for what you do! Keep your heads down, keep your spirits up, and know that you are in our hearts every day.

    Stay safe, brother.

    Lauren

  4. elf says:

    Old Blue,

    Sorry to bleed on your page, but here’s my terp plug again (CP One Foundation – CPOF exists to help interpreters get out and to the USA).

    http://www.cponefoundation.org/

    I think the Afghan terps sound a great deal less scared than the Iraqi ones, but that’s my POV only.

  5. Saif says:

    hooah!!! Plugging that group like crazy. And this blog too. Awesome job, Blue.
    One way or the other, we’re a part of history being made here. I just hope it’s “good” history.

  6. Rosemary says:

    Great link. Thank you.

  7. OldSoldier54 says:

    Will do, Blue. God bless and keep you and all those with you … and yes, I do mean those Afghan patriots you speak of.

  8. M Irwin says:

    Hey Blue,
    Love your Blog, I just left that area in May of 09( Team Ronin),We were part of the 33rd IBCT . Spent a lot of time in Tagab Valley as PMT, Spent many nights at KB when we went in Alasay Valley. Loved the reference to Col Z in a previous post. Ate many a meal with him and the Tagab ANP, Many a cup of Chi. I am working on a website now, have over 3000 pictures from when we were there. Keep up the good work, stay safe and know one thing, You do make a difference.

  9. Roz says:

    I agree – I consider it an honour to be able to work with these guys, for even only a short time. They have taught me so much about the importance of family and friendship.

  10. [...] Erstellt am 15. September 2010 von rustygreen Der Original-Artikel erschien auf Afghan Quest: „Interpreters On Facebook“, von Old Blue, am [...]

Post a Comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

\/ More Options ...
Change Theme...
  • Users » 1
  • Posts/Pages » 306
  • Comments » 1,707
  • comprar viagra Heidelberg
    figurings Burlington buy viagra online buy viagra online beagles De Hert Paul, Gutwirth Serge (2003) Making sense of privacy and data protection. A prospective overview in the light of the future of identity, location based services and the virtual residence. Security and Privacy for the Citizen in the Post-September 11 Digital Age. Oysters are normally held in mesh bags attached to trestles. These are covered for most of the tidal cycle, being exposed at low water. Conditions adjacent to and beneath these trestles can vary with soft sediment and drifting plant accumulations. Birds do not appear to be impacted by the presence of oyster farms but are disturbed when these are tended. These are multiple choice assessments with one correct answer. Clicking on an answer will bring you to another page. If your answer is correct, then it is acknowledged with a short explanation. Please read the explanation carefully and proceed to the next assessment as prompted at the bottom of the page. Prior radical prostatectomy series have stendra online shown an inverse association between prostate size and high grade cancer. It has been suggested that smaller size prostates arise in a low androgen environment, enabling development of more aggressive cancer. We propose that this observation is the result of ascertainment bias driven by prostate specific antigen performance. If a figure has been published, acknowledge the original source and submit written permission from the copyright holder to reproduce the material. Permission is required, irrespective of authorship or publisher, except for documents in the public domain. Titles and detailed explanations belong in the legends for figures, not on the figures themselves. Consistency in size within the article is strongly preferred. Any special instructions regarding sizing should be clearly noted..
Change Theme...
  • VoidVoid « Default
  • LifeLife
  • EarthEarth
  • WindWind
  • WaterWater
  • FireFire
  • LightLight

About Blue



    No Child Pages.
custom essay writing service buyanessaysonline.com